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Tag Archives: neroli

Pale yellow, mobile liquid.

Very fine and fresh, soft floral, with hesperidic nuances, well rounded. Slightly pungent, vert, terpy; evoluting from white fresh flowers to a metallic, rosey, ocimene-like, warm odour; very slightly indolic, but in a pleasant way, perfectly balanced.
A subtle, sweet tension produced by some linalyl acetate-like molecules, enlightens its aura. It somewhat recalls me the odour of wet, hot cotton tissue. It has a powdery, ‘clean’ aspect. After 15 minutes smelling it beautifully dries out and stabilises in a pronounced hesperidic bergamot-petitgrain-like whiff, and a tender flower suggesting hints of hay, tobacco, civet under a green fleshy and waxy veil.

Smelling this oil, discovering its facets throughout the evaporation curve is enchanting, a charming experience.

I like to ask me how one could use this product in a new, original way. Besides conventional compositions (colognes, chypres, fougères) or soliflores featuring orange blossom or rose, this material may need complete reinventing. It does smell just wonderful all alone, simply diluted in alcohol. It’s great in simple mixes (with woody, musky materials), but quite boring.. I think I should do some research on the flowery side of the perfumer’s palette. For example: it could be worth testing in some fine Narcisse, Lilac base, or leafy, green, imitation tea accord (its sweet fruitiness does fit well, indeed).

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@ 100% pungent, chemical, thin sweet, heavy-flower, ylang, fruity, musty, grape.
@ 5% sweet, floral, ylang, orange blossom.

Useful in low concentrations in floral compositions, in imitation orange blossom, neroli, jasmine, tuberose, narcissus…
It reacts with aldehydes, forming condensation products (Schiff’s bases). Aurantiol is hydroxycitronellal+methyl anthranilate.

@ 100% almost odorless when pure. Metallic, oily odour due to oxidation.

During evaporation a subtle white flower-lily of the valley-like, fresh, sweet, delicate nuance appears. It is natural and fragile, deep and beautiful. It is a great addition to any floral composition, especially to neroli, where hydroxycitronellal and other muguet odorants can’t compete with the simple and refined character of this molecule.